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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Mold Remediation FAQs: What Homeowners Should Know

3/14/2019 (Permalink)

For most of us, our homes represent safe, healthy, and happy places. But you might not even realize that your house could easily be taken over by mold. If you've experienced water damage or have excessive moisture in parts of your home, it's possible that you may have a mold problem you don't even know about. If you do, it's essential to take care of this problem as quickly and as effectively as possible. In today's post, we'll discuss the solution -- mold remediation -- and answer some of the most common questions homeowners may have.

Where and How Does Mold Grow?

Let's start out with some mold basics. Mold can be found virtually everywhere, both inside and outside. Most of the time, mold is invisible, airborne, and relatively harmless. But when it makes its way into your home and starts to grow, that's when you can have a real problem.

Mold can grow on virtually any surface and can derive nutrients from both organic and synthetic products. It's typically aided by moisture or water, though some types of mold need more than others. For example, if you live in a humid climate, have a leaky roof, or have experienced basement flooding, this will make a mold infestation much more likely. It takes only 48 hours for mold to set in -- and the longer the environment remains wet, the more likely your home and belongings are to be damaged or permanently destroyed. That's why it's so important to take action early on; the longer you wait, the more the mold will multiply and the worse the damage will become.

How Can I Recognize Mold Growth?

One of the most recognizable signs of mold is the characteristically musty smell it has. If you associate basements with a musty odor, mold may actually be the reason why. It's also likely to grow in attics, within carpets, in crawlspaces and closets, and behind walls. It's possible, however, that you could have mold growth without ever detecting this distinctive odor. Mold also reveals itself visually and usually leaves visible stains on ceilings, walls, or even on furniture. It can usually be recognized as some type of discoloration; growths that are black, white, brown, tan, green, or even purple are often identified as mold. If you know your home is prone to flooding or you've experienced abnormally humid weather, you might want to keep your eyes peeled (and your nose sharp) for signs of mold.

What is Mold Remediation?

Now, let's talk a bit more about mold remediation. Remediation entails the removal and/or the clean-up of mold from an environment, such as a home or a place of business. There actually is a slight difference between remediation and removal, however. Some companies like to promise consumers that they can remove 100% of the mold from their homes. But mold exists everywhere, so this really isn't an accurate statement at all. Remediation actually refers to bringing mold inside a building back to normal, acceptable, and safe levels. If a company uses the term "remediation," it's usually a pretty good indication that they understand the science behind this process and are experts in their field.

What's Involved in the Mold Remediation Process?

Every company has their own remediation process, but generally speaking, there are some specific steps that are followed in most cases. Remediation specialists will inspect and assess the extent of the mold and the damage it has caused. Then, they will contain the mold, filtrate the air, remove the mold and mold damage, and clean the materials left behind. Depending on the circumstances, this process can take anywhere from a single day to a little less than a week.

Is It Possible to DIY Mold Removal?

Although DIY mold removal is technically possible, it's really not recommended. When you make disturbances to mold, it actually causes the spores to spread and can actually make the problem worse. Unless you have the proper equipment and training to perform mold remediation, it's not a good idea to try doing this yourself. To ensure this process is done correctly the first time, you'll want to enlist the help of professionals.

Think you're dealing with a mold infestation? We're here to help. For more information, please contact our team today.

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